Nursing Students’ Critical Thinking, Problem Solving and Self Directive Learning Skills: The Effect of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) Versus Lecture Based Learning (LBL)

 

Background: There is a lot of literature on Problem-Based Learning (PBL) in medical and nursing education, but there isn’t much from a cultural standpoint. As a result, the study’s goal was to compare the outcomes of nursing students who received PBL with standard lecture in terms of critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-directed learning. PBL, or student-centered outcome-based learning, has become increasingly important in higher education and has been shown to increase learning quality among students at all levels and across disciplines.

Methods: A randomised controlled trial (RCT) design was employed with 85 undergraduate students who were enrolled in a mental nursing course and studied at level seven. The following instruments were used: PBL Evaluation Questionnaire with 20 elements for self-report (PBLEQ). The 14 items on the Self-assessment Scale on Active Learning and Critical Thinking (SSACT) scale are divided into two categories: “active learning” and “critical thinking.” With coefficient alpha >0.8, all scales were highly reliable.

The experimental group was regarded PBL is effective in their learning process (t=3.568; p0.05) according to the study results, which demonstrated that the survey response rates were 100%. At pre and post intervention, the total SSACT indicated a significant difference in the experimental group (t=6.413; p0.05). In the pretest, there was a significant difference in percentage score between the experimental and control groups (t=2.374, p0.05).

Conclusion: This study provides information on the usefulness of PBL in building professional knowledge, developing problem-solving abilities, creating self-directed learning, and improving motivation from the perspective of students. It also encourages effective group collaboration while also encouraging active learning and critical thinking. As a result, PBL can easily be considered an alternate approach of teaching nursing students because it allows students to act as experts in clinical situations with little knowledge and motivates them to think not only deeply but also rigorously while establishing lifelong learning abilities.

Author (S) Details

Hend Al Najjar
Pediatric Nursing, King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences, College of Nursing, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Amal Ibrahim Khalil
Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, Menoufyia University, Egypt and King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences, College of Nursing, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

Siti Awa Abu Bakar
Adult Nursing, King Saud Bin Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences, College of Nursing, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

View Book :- https://stm.bookpi.org/IDHR-V5/article/view/3972

 

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