Laser Sensing for Monitoring and Elimination of Oil Pollution at Sea

The spectral characteristics of laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) for oil products in various states are covered in this article (solutions in seawater and thin slicks). This study was carried out to assess the effectiveness of LIF in the quantification of bilge water-related ocean pollution and the identification of oil products. It was found that depending on the state of the oil product, the LIF spectral distribution’s form changed (pure fuel, slick or solution). The most popular types of heavy and light marine fuels were used to calibrate the LIF technique at solution concentrations, and limit of detection (LoD) values were created for each type. The time dynamics of the solution spectra were studied and time change characteristics were found. To examine the LIF for marine oil pollution, a small-scale LIF sensor for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) is described. The effectiveness of using dispersants to remove oil films from the sea surface and the effects of oil pollution and dispersants in removing oil films on the state of phytoplankton communities can both be studied using the LIF approach, according to experimental evidence.

Author(s) Details:

Oleg Bukin,
Maritime State University named after Admiral G.I. Nevelskoy, Maritime Technopark, 690003 Vladivostok, Russia.

Dmitry Proschenko
Maritime State University named after Admiral G.I. Nevelskoy, Maritime Technopark, 690003 Vladivostok, Russia and Laboratory of Analytical Laser Spectroscopy, Far Eastern Federal University, 690091 Vladivostok, Russia.

Chekhlenok Alexey,
Maritime State University named after Admiral G.I. Nevelskoy, Maritime Technopark, 690003 Vladivostok, Russia.

Denis Korovetskiy,
Maritime State University named after Admiral G.I. Nevelskoy, Maritime Technopark, 690003 Vladivostok, Russia.

Ilya Bukin,
Maritime State University named after Admiral G.I. Nevelskoy, Maritime Technopark, 690003 Vladivostok, Russia.

Viktoria Yurchik,
Maritime State University named after Admiral G.I. Nevelskoy, Maritime Technopark, 690003 Vladivostok, Russia.

Irina Sokolova,
Maritime State University named after Admiral G.I. Nevelskoy, Maritime Technopark,
690003 Vladivostok, Russia.

Andrey Nadezhkin,

Maritime State University named after Admiral G.I. Nevelskoy, Maritime Technopark, 690003 Vladivostok, Russia.

Please see the link here: https://stm.bookpi.org/TAIER-V2/article/view/8277

Keywords: Laser-induced fluorescence, oil pollution, slick, marine fuel, bilge water, limit of detection, machine learning, unmanned aerial vehicle

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