Editor Papa Research May 29, 2019

Can emotional intelligence be trained? A meta-analytical investigation

Human resource practitioners place value on selecting and training a more emotionally intelligent workforce. Despite this, research has yet to systematically investigate whether emotional intelligence can in fact be trained. This study addresses this question by conducting a meta-analysis to assess the effect of training on emotional intelligence, and whether effects are moderated by substantive and methodological moderators. We identified a total of 58 published and unpublished studies that included an emotional intelligence training program using either a pre-post or treatment-control design. We calculated Cohen’s d to estimate the effect of formal training on emotional intelligence scores. The results showed a moderate positive effect for training, regardless of design. Effect sizes were larger for published studies than dissertations. Effect sizes were relatively robust over gender of participants, and type of EI measure (ability v. mixedmodel). Further, our effect sizes are in line with other meta-analytic studies of competency-based training programs. Implications for practice and future research on EI training are discussed. [1]

Building collaboration in teams through emotional intelligence: Mediation by SOAR (strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results)

In today’s global business environment teams are fast becoming the norm. Collaboration is an essential factor in leveraging team effectiveness, and organizations are looking for strategies to increase collaboration among their teams. In this study, we administered an eSurvey to 308 professionals working in face-to-face and virtual teams to investigate emotional intelligence and strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results as strategies to support the collaborative process. Results found the regression of collaboration on emotional intelligence (controlling for age, ethnicity, and education) was significant (p<.01). Results also found a significant indirect effect between emotional intelligence and collaboration as mediated by strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results (β=0.110, Z=2.444). We focus on understanding the effect of emotional intelligence on team collaboration as mediated by strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results. Recommendations are provided for increasing emotional intelligence and strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results among team members. Our research has important implications for teams and their pervasive use in business. [2]

Emotional intelligence, servant leadership, and development goal orientation in athletic directors

Scholars and policy makers have long considered sport as a vehicle for promoting young athletes’ well-being, educational experience, and citizenship skills. Athletic directors can play a significant role in this process by establishing organizational goals that can foster the development of young athletes and also by ensuring that other personnel abide by these goals. However, little is known about methods athletic directors can use to focus on such development goals in the midst of the current winning-at-all-costs culture surrounding sports. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between emotional intelligence, servant leadership, and development goal orientation among high school athletic directors. A total of 445 athletic directors located in 48 states in the United States completed an online survey. The results indicated that emotional intelligence is positively associated with servant leadership, which in turn is positively associated with development goal orientation. The mediation analysis also revealed that servant leadership fully mediates the relationship between emotional intelligence and development goal orientation among athletic directors. The findings of this research assist in understanding how sports governing bodies can educate athletic directors to initiate development-oriented reform of the winning-at-all-costs culture in sports. [3]

Examining brain structures associated with dispositional envy and the mediation role of emotional intelligence

Dispositional envy is distinguished by definition and neurally from episodic envy. While the neural correlates of episodic envy have been evaluated by specific tasks in previous studies, little is known about the structural neural basis of dispositional envy. In this study, we investigated the structural neural basis of dispositional envy underlying individual differences across two independent samples comprising a total of 100 young healthy adults. Firstly, 73 subjects’ data (sample 1) was analyzed, and we assessed the association between regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and dispositional envy using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Furthermore, we explored the role of emotional intelligence in the association between GMV and dispositional envy. VBM indicated that dispositional envy was positively correlated with GMV in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and superior temporal gyrus (STG). We also found that emotional intelligence partially mediated the association between DLPFC volume and dispositional envy. These results were replicated in another independent sample (Sample 2, n = 27). These results provide the first evidence that dispositional envy exhibits a structural neural correlation with the DLPFC and STG, and give a neutral explanation for why individuals with high emotional intelligence exhibit less envy.[4]

Emotional Intelligence and Its Impact on the Emotional Factors among Nurses

Aims: Emotional intelligence (EI) has been extensively studied in workplace settings. In the nursing field, however, the research data is limited. This study aimed to estimate the EI of nursing personnel in public hospitals in Cyprus, determine which factors were associated with EI, and examine how EI correlated with the emotional state (i.e., anxiety, stress and depression).

Study Design: The study design was cross-sectional.

Place and Duration of Study: The population under examination was derived from a reference population of nursing staff working in public hospitals in Cyprus between April and May of 2016.

Methodology: A total of 585 nurses completed the Greek Emotional Intelligence Scale (GEIS), consisting of 52 items measuring four basic emotional skills (expression and recognition of emotions, control of emotions, use of emotions to facilitate thinking, and caring and empathy), and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS 21), as well as questions regarding demographic, socioeconomic and occupational characteristics.

Results: The EI total mean score was 184.30. The nurses aged 36–50 years old had the highest EI scores (mean = 191.5, p = .000), with a positive effect on the EI coming from years of service (>12 years, p = .01), leadership positions (p = .003), being married (p = .02) and having children (p = .001). The overall ΕΙ scores had a moderate negative correlation with the emotional state of the nurses (depression r = -454, p = .000; stress r = -415, p = .000; anxiety r = -390, p = .000).

Conclusion: The present study revealed suboptimal EI scores and confirmed the negative relationship with the emotional state of nurses. Based on the literature, the EI can be developed; therefore, suitable programs could substantially improve the emotional skills in nursing personnel. [5]

Reference

[1] Mattingly, V. and Kraiger, K., 2019. Can emotional intelligence be trained? A meta-analytical investigation. Human Resource Management Review29(2), pp.140-155.(Web Link)

[2] Cole, M.L., Cox, J.D. and Stavros, J.M., 2019. Building collaboration in teams through emotional intelligence: Mediation by SOAR (strengths, opportunities, aspirations, and results). Journal of Management & Organization25(2), pp.263-283.(Web Link)

[3] Lee, Y.H., 2019. Emotional intelligence, servant leadership, and development goal orientation in athletic directors. Sport Management Review22(3), pp.395-406.(Web Link)

[4] Examining brain structures associated with dispositional envy and the mediation role of emotional intelligence

Yanhui XiangSasa ZhaoHanlin WangQihan WuFeng Kong & Lei Mo

Scientific Reports volume7, Article number: 39947 (2017)(Web Link)

[5] Konstantinou, M., Efstathiou, A., Charalambous, G., Kaitelidou, D. and Jelastopulu, E. (2017) “Emotional Intelligence and Its Impact on the Emotional Factors among Nurses”, Journal of Education, Society and Behavioural Science, 23(3), pp. 1-13. doi: 10.9734/JESBS/2017/37818.

(Web Link)

 

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